What are the Alternative menu features?

Alternative menu features are actions to be executed on one of the favorites in your QAP menu. After you click one of the options in the Alternative menu, the full QAP menu is displayed to let you choose on what favorite you want to execute the Alternative menu feature.

Alternative  menu triggers (mouse default is Shift+middle mouse button and keyboard default is Shift+Windows+W).

  • These triggers show the Alternative menu over any windows.
  • In the Alternative menu, you select the actions to apply to one of your favorite (see the list of Alternative menu features below).
  • Then, in the QAP menu, select the target favorite on which the Alternative menu feature will be executed.

Alternative menu features

The Alternative menu offers the following features:

  • Open in new window: open the favorite in a new window instead of changing the folder in the target window (even if the menu is opened in an existing Explorer window or in a file dialog box).
  • Edit a Favorite: change a favorite settings directly from the QAP menu (without having to open the Settings window).
  • Copy a Favorite's Path or URL: copy the file path or the URL of a favorite to your clipboard in order to paste it in any other window.
  • Run as administrator: run the application with administrator access (elevated privileges).
  • Open the Containing Folder in the Current Window: open in the current Explorer window the parent folder of the selected favorite document, application or folder.
  • Open the Containing Folder in a New Window: open the parent folder of the selected favorite in a new window (even if the menu is opened in an existing Explorer window or in a file dialog box).

Three Alternative menu features are also available directly from the regular menu by using keyboard modifiers when clicking a favorite in the popup menu (see also: Can I launch Alternative menu features directly from the regular popup menu?):

  • Shift + Click:  Open in new window.
  • Control + Click: Copy a Favorite's Path or URL.
  • Shift + Control + Click: Edit a Favorite.

 

Why are QAP context menus not working in some windows?

In some setup, the QAP context menus may work in Windows Explorer windows but not in a custom file manager.  Or the opposite.

This is generally because some applicatinos are running with different access privileges.

For example, if your file manager is running with administrator permissions while QAPmessenger.exe (that app transmitting commands from context menus to QAP) is running with standard permissions, messages sent from the context menu could not be received by QAP. Maybe you should run your file manager with regular permission or, on the opposite, launch QAPmessenger.exe with elevated privileges.

The opposite could also be true: if QAP runs in admin mode and Windows Explorer (or your custom file manager) in standard mode, context menus in Explorer could not launch QAP commands because QAP has higher permissions than Explorer. Context menu can only call apps having privileges equal or lower than Windows Explorer has.

Please read more about QAP and Windows Access Control List (ACL).

To find more about installation and enabling of Explorer context menu, read the Explorer Context Menus Help.

Why is the middle mouse button not working over some windows?

Most of the time, this issue is related to ACL (Windows Access Control List).

Each window in Windows is launched with a given set of rights. Basically, there are two levels:

  • user level (standard permissions)
  • administrator level (elevated permissions)

With elevated privileges, user can make changes to the system that can affect all other users on the system.

Quick Access Popup hotkeys (by default, middle mouse button) only works on windows that have equal or lower access level. If you start an application with an higher "administrator" privileges (using the Run As Administrator Windows Explorer menu), QAP will not have the permission to open its menu over the windows created by this app. To do so, you would have to also launch QAP with administrator privileges.

Is it a good idea to launch QAP as Administrator? You have to know that every program started from QAP will the also inherit these enhanced rights. This could allow them to do changes on your system without prompting you. From a system security point of view, this may put your system at risk. In other words, you have to know what you are doing.

Can QAP launch an application with administrator privileges?

Yes. If QAP is running with administrator permission, all applications it will launch will automatically inherit the admin level. But you should not run QAP with admin privileges unless you have good reasons to do so.

Check the option Elevate application with administration privileges in the Advanced Settings of the Edit Favorite dialog box. Of course, before launching the application, Windows will display the usual approval dialog box or ask for the admin password.

See more information about Windows ACL (Access Control List) and QAP.

Can I launch QAP with administrator privileges?

Yes, starting with QAP v8.7.1. But do you really want to launch QAP as an administrator? Keep in mind that User Account Control (UAC) is there to protect you against yourselves or against hackers. When running Quick Access Popup in Administrator mode, every application launched by QAP inherits administrative privileges. This can result in unexpected consequences when launching programs that may themselves be infected with malicious code. This could allow malicious programs to inherit administrative privileges and to damage, infect or take control of your computer.

Windows User Account Control (UAC) logo

To launch QAP with "elevated UAC privileges", click the checkbox Run as administrator in the Options window, first tab. After saving options with Run as administrator enabled, QAP will offer to reload itself in Admin mode. On the opposite, after saving with this option turned OFF, QAP could not relaunch itself as normal user because the reloaded instance of QAP would inherit admin privileges. Instead, QAP will offer to quit and you will have to relaunch it yourselves.

When launching QAP with administrator privileges, Windows asks for an administrator password if the current user has normal privileges. If user declines elevation (ie: do not enter the admin password), QAP is launched with normal privileges. If user enters the admin password, QAP displays a security alert to remind user about the risks described earlier. Also, the QAP icon in the Notification zone (tray icon) embeds the Windows UAC logo and the "[admin]" tag is added to the application name in Settings window and other dialog boxes when QAP is running as administrator (only if QAP is running as admin because of the "Run as administrator" option, ie: not if user launched QAP as administrator by other means).

Power user who need to run QAP in admin mode and want to skip the security alert can launch QAP with the command-line parameter /AdminSilent (you can use a Windows shortcut to add this parameter).